A Travellerspoint blog

2003 - Before the Last Sail

Short Trips


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & Maryland Meanderings in 2003 & The Tail End of 2002 & 2002 Heart Attack at Shroud Key & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

After The End of 2002 we mostly took short trips in Maryland

In January our daughter E. moved to Texas and Bob helped get her house ready to sell.
E's house in Maryland

E's house in Maryland

New house in Texas

New house in Texas


Then in April, our daughter D. was moving back from England, and we did the house inspection with her
Inspector looking up the chimney

Inspector looking up the chimney

Home inspector in the driveway with D and Bob

Home inspector in the driveway with D and Bob


and after she went back to England, we did final walk-through and closing for her (with her oldest son)
Walkthrough before signing the mortgage papers

Walkthrough before signing the mortgage papers


We put the boat in the water so we could do some sailing this summer
RosalieAnn in the travelift

RosalieAnn in the travelift


Range boat in our home marina

Range boat in our home marina


June 29, 2003 - Sunday - Leaving Smith Creek

We finally had a suitable weather window this week. I had listened to NOAA's broadcast carefully and considered the time of week etc. (which places had restaurants closed on Monday and/or Tuesday) and had thought that we might go over to the Yeocomico and then down to Reedville, over to the Onancock and then back to Smith Creek (off the Potomac).

When I suggested this itinerary to Bob he appeared under whelmed and said he wanted to go to Crisfield. Bob's aunt had a house here so we've been to Crisfield by land before.

Aside: Crisfield is a tiny village of less than 2800 people on the Delmarva peninsula. It is the town that is the farthest south in Maryland on the Chesapeake Bay before you get to Virginia. Crisfield calls itself the crab capitol. Well-known residents have included: Wesley Nelson, founder of Del Monte. Another claim to fame that Crisfield has is that it was the home of the Ward Brothers who made fantastically realistic decoys. The town was originally called Somer's Cove after one of two settlers in the area. They started out as farmers, but soon became watermen. The harbor and marina are still called Somers Cove. Billions of oyster shells were used in the foundations for local roads, buildings and railroads. That's because of the low lying marshy land. Some places in Louisiana use oyster shells in a similar fashion. Then a businessman named Crisfield got the railroad extended as far as Somer's Cove so that their product could be shipped quickly. Some stories say that the town was renamed in honor of Crisfield to appease him when he fell through a rotten pier. End Aside

So I re figured and recalculated and thought we had agreed to go to Reedville and then to Crisfield and then (because we heard they dredged the channel) to Tangier Island. Went down to the boat Sunday, loaded our stuff on,
Bob putting up the bimini side curtain

Bob putting up the bimini side curtain

Bob through the windscreen

Bob through the windscreen


and motored out of the Smith Creek channel about 11:45 a.m..
Leaving Smith Creek

Leaving Smith Creek


Transiting the Potomac

We had VERY light winds but were sailing across the Potomac with the motor just above idle. I put the track to Reedville on the computer to follow. Finally as we approached the entrance markers for the Yeocomico I said "If we keep going in this direction, we'll be in the river". At that point I found out that was where Bob thought we WERE going. So we turned east along the south shore of the Potomac, took down the sails and headed for Smith Point which is the south (Virginia) bank of the Potomac and has no relation to Smith Creek
20-001.jpgSmith Point lighthouse

Smith Point lighthouse

Smith Point Lighthouse

Smith Point Lighthouse

Smith Point Lighthouse

Smith Point Lighthouse


The winds were supposed to be SW, which would have worked, but they were SE to E, and so were on the nose. We slogged along. I saw a kind of standing wave in the middle of the Potomac - only about a foot high but about 40 feet long - not apparently going anywhere and in about 70 feet of water.

I thought the winds would be OK to sail south once we got into the Bay, but at that point the winds switched to SW - right on the nose again. Bob asked what the blue line was. It was the track that I had put into the computer - that's how long it's been since we've done this. We had lots of little tiny flies in the cockpit. This is so common when there's not much wind that we never go anywhere without our fly swatters. These little flies seemed pretty sluggish though and I could squash them with just my hand. They were also so small they went right through the fly swatter slots.

Approaching the Great Wicomico

As we approached the Great Wicomico (one of the 4 Wicomico Rivers off the Bay) Bob started to see a lot of crab pots and also fish traps (aka pound nets). There appeared to be a line of three fish trap segments (pound nets) from shore out past the Great Wicomico spider between us and the entrance. So rather than try to get between the segments (not being sure if there were nets there or not), we went around them.
Pound nets

Pound nets


Approaching Reedville

The Great Wicomico is fairly free of crab pots up as far as Reedville because I think the menhaden boats run over them and get rid of them. We had previously gone to the Reedville Marina, but I couldn't find any confirmation anywhere that it was still in business. We heard someone call them on the radio, without a result as they don't monitor the radio. The wind dropped as we entered the river.

We debated whether to anchor in Mill Creek (where we've been twice before), to go up and anchor in Cockrell Creek by Reedville, go to Buzzard's Point marina (on the other side of Cockrell Creek from Reedville, or anchor somewhere else. Because the wind was from the south, we eliminated the two Reedville options, since if the menhaden plant was working, the odoriferous smoke would be blowing toward Reedville.
Menhaden smokestack (no smoke)

Menhaden smokestack (no smoke)


As we came in the river, there were two groups of folks on PWCs coming out. We looked up toward Reedville and could see the menhaden boats and the stacks - they weren't smoking, but we weren't sure if that was because they didn't work on Sunday or what. I was afraid that Mill Creek would be crowded (that's where groups from our marina often go although I've never seen but one other boat there).
Sandy Point

Sandy Point


So we went about 2.5 miles up the river and anchored behind Sandy Point on the south side in a horse shoe bend shaped area. Sandy Point itself had a statue or a totem of wood on the end of it. People used to land and picnic or swim there, but I guess that is no longer possible. It looks liked 'owned' land now.
Other boats anchored

Other boats anchored


There were two boats already anchored there when we came in -right up near shore. Looking with binoculars, I saw that one was LAMOUR from Virginia Beach was one and the other was from Norfolk, but the stern was too far away to read the name. Might have been PRINCESS. There was a little power boat pulling someone on an inner tube around.

The anchor set hard and we shut everything down after a trip of 29.5 nm at about 1830. Before I shut the computer down though, I did the route to go to Crisfield tomorrow. We were too tired to cook so Bob heated up Dinty Moore stew for dinner and watched the sun set and other folks come in to anchor. First was a boat that I think was a Westsail named JURA from Beaufort SC with a hard dink named BLIZZARD of 96. They anchored a good distance away the same distance from shore as we were. They had an SSCA Associates flag. We were behind LAMOUR and they were behind PRINCESS.

Then a boat named INTERLUDE from Crownsville came in and anchored between us. While anchoring, they took down their sail causing Bob to comment that he was glad he didn't have to do all that flaking and folding and tying and covering (we have all roller furling). They anchored in a most peculiar way - at one point going in a circle around their anchor. They had a red flag with a white ketch and some letters on it, plus a blue and white pennant.

We put up the anchor light/ball and prepared for the night. The big red sun went down - almost disappearing just above the horizon in the haze. A little boat passed us and went to the other side of the anchorage.
Sunset

Sunset


We have a new Follow-Me and Direct TV satellite which worked well. This was the first time we had a chance to test it at anchor. (The Follow-Me keeps the satellite dish directed at the satellite even if the boat moves) We got a good clear picture, but the inverter apparently couldn't get enough power and kept whistling which was very annoying. I also couldn't get my computer to charge until I put it on an inverter in with the nav-station outlet which has bigger wires.

It was cool and a bit windy - enough to crank up the wind gen. Either the wind or the current meant that the boat swung a big arc which made the Follow-Me work a lot and ate up a lot of current.

Apparently another boat named ARIEL came in and anchored on the other side of JURA after dark. In any case, we had a peaceful night.

Monday June 30, 2003 - First Visit to Crisfield

This morning everyone in the anchorage was all in somewhat different places and we had all turned to the south (before we were all pointing east). ARIEL that came in after we went to bed has a rainbow wind sock. JURA is in front of us with ARIEL in front of them and INTERLUDE is almost beside us.

Bob started pulling the anchor and then we had breakfast (I had scrambled eggs and Bob had cereal).

The Toshiba keeps asking me for virus definitions, which I can't get for it now of course because I need the internet for that. I left the GPS on the pedestal on all night as an anchor watch and to recharge it's memory battery, but Bob turned the pedestal off, so in the morning all the batteries were low and had to be replaced and the memory battery still needed to be recharged.

Bob tried to start on the battery bank we'd been using all night and was unsuccessful so we switched to the other bank to start. The little boat that came in at sunset and anchored on the other side of the cove is underway and out of there by 7:15.

I had to power the anchor out as it was really stuck firm in the oyster shell mud bottom. As we were pulling out of the anchorage, a big Catalina called DREAM LADY (or Lady of Dreams) motored by. We were underway by 0750.
Small barge in the Wicomico

Small barge in the Wicomico


Looked up toward Reedville as we passed - no smoke yet, but we did see a small barge going up the creek. Looked back and several boats were following us out of the river.
Boat following us

Boat following us


We passed the spider at 0820 and ran the refrigeration. I got a bit of sun yesterday so I put on sunscreen and also put a floatie on my glasses because if they fall or are knocked off I won't be able to see them on the bottom like I did in Nassau.

We motor sailed until we reached the Tangier Light
Speed boat by Tangier Light

Speed boat by Tangier Light


and then the winds became variable, dropped to almost nothing and were from directly astern so Bob pulled in the sails. It was very hot with no wind.

We passed the head boat Miss H. B. Good II, and the
Tangier Island Ferry boat

Tangier Island Ferry boat


passed us. We saw what looked like a fleet of menhaden boats in action. Saw many other fishing boats and heard a lot of chatter on the radio - some from fishermen but a lot of one sailboat calling another. One guy was calling a menhaden boat - the menhaden boat didn't answer of course. (They are busy fishing and don't answer.)

Menhaden boats spot a school of menhaden and encircle them with nets - usually they take the ends of the net around the school in a small boat. A small sailboat came by up on plane like a power boat. They got to the marker off Tangier and stopped -then turned and went toward Tangier. Probably a Mac (Macintosh)

We came around by James Island, which is mostly low marshy land and no longer has anyone living there, although the Jane's Island State Park is there (charts call it James Island and some other sources call it Jane's Island). I read from the Gunkholer's Guide and other guidebooks about Crisfield to Bob. We start seeing the landmarks mentioned in the guidebooks, like the old fertilizer plant stack on a peninsula at the south end of Jane's Island. This plant burned down many years ago, but it is noted on the charts and is a landmark from the water.
Brick building landmark for entrance to the harbor

Brick building landmark for entrance to the harbor


The Gunkholer's Guide said to look for a large brick building as a landmark to find the entrance to the harbor and then look for a small sign pointing to the harbor entrance.

I had called the marina (which is a state facility) the day before to get a reservation, so when we got to the 10 and 11 markers we called them again in the harbor, and got our slip assignment. It was E6. We motored in to the channel with the headboat BARBARA ANN II breathing down our neck because she's faster than we are.
Barbara_Ann_II

Barbara_Ann_II

After I managed to miss-throw the line twice, we got into our slip. It was very hot and I was sweating, which I hate as it saps all my energy which is little enough to begin with. Our trip was 32.7 miles and took 6 hours 17 minutes.
RosalieAnn in the slip

RosalieAnn in the slip


Somers Cove Marina is a very large marina which has the usual amenities - laundry facilities, showers, pump out and fuel dock with gas and diesel. In addition they also have a pool, tennis courts, boat storage, Concierge Accommodations, Van Service, free email phone line (which I could not get to work for me), bicycle rentals, boat launching ramp, pavilions for picnics with benches tables and grills, and 24 hour surveillance. $1/ft and $3 for 30 amp
Marina office and pool

Marina office and pool


I got myself together and got off the boat (fixed docks and I needed the steps that we carry because it was high tide) and went up and paid. The Gunkholer's Guide says that there is a surcharge for the use of a credit card, but I didn't see that was the case. The marina gave us all kinds of information about the area.
Welcome to Crisfield

Welcome to Crisfield


We hadn't had lunch, but it was so hot we weren't hungry. Eventually we got the boat secured and walked up to the Millard Tawes museum.
Bob walking up to the Museum

Bob walking up to the Museum

Processing the Chesapeake Oyster (sign outside the museum)

Processing the Chesapeake Oyster (sign outside the museum)

Display window on the museum "Crisfield Gateway to the Islands"

Display window on the museum "Crisfield Gateway to the Islands"

00309532298720110308184811548.jpgPaintings on the side of the museum

Paintings on the side of the museum


This was $2.50 each and I don't think it was worth it. The museum has a rule about no photography. So I took a photo of the J. Millard Tawes statue that was in the lobby, and then cut him out of the picture just leaving what I can see through the doors.
Through the door

Through the door


On the far left you can dimly see the 'woolies' and on the right is the mural next to the single fish tank (the aquarium) with some minnows in it (no information on what was in there if you didn't know).

They had a little display with a log canoe, an exhibit on crabs and one on oystering. The most interesting exhibit was on Woolies - Maritime Artwork of the Past. Woolies which are pictures of ships usually embroidered by sailors in the British Navy in wool on linen or cotton. Usually long stitch was used. Silk, linen or cotton threads were used to highlight details. Occasionally mica, carved tortoise shell, whalebone or ebony were used to represent cannons or other ship's fittings.
Front of the Woolie's exhibit brochure

Front of the Woolie's exhibit brochure


Some of the woolies in this exhibit are:
HMS Narcissus Under Sail
HMS Queen
Merchant Ship Maggie Mine
HMS Victoria
HMS Pylades
HMS Orion
Passenger Vessel HMS Arawa
HMS Duke of Wellington
Brig Jesse Ellen

All 19th century sailors had to know how to sew in order to mend their clothes and sails, and they used their spare time to embroider these pieces in the same way that they also did scrimshaw work. These embroideries are similar to crewel embroidery and may even be a type of crewel embroidery which is defined as embroidery with wool thread.

We got ourselves cooled off while we watched a pretty interesting video tape which has a very good explanation of the history of the town - it was produced by MPT. The video tape included a bit on the sex life of crabs. The female gets under the male and sheds her shell. He stands over her to protect her. She lies on her back, and allows him to fertilize her eggs. I had not know the details of this before. The gift shop was closed as it was open less hours than the museum.

I also took a photo of the fiberglass shore bird in the lobby
Chessie

Chessie


On it is pictured a hunting dog that is local to the Chesapeake Bay and is a Chesapeake Bay Retriever. This dogs are generally liver brown with a dense flat curley coat. They are heavy bodied dogs somewhat like a labrador except that they are brown with a curley coat instead of black. They love the water so they were used as duck or goose hunting dogs. We had one of these dogs and he'd go down and break the ice in the river to go swimming and come back all covered with icicles.

The museum offers a walking tour which we didn't take
Posted_walking_tour_map

Posted_walking_tour_map


... the warning on the walking tour map. "Look both ways before crossing the streets. Some of our citizens are more accustomed to driving boats than motor vehicles" You can also take a tour of J. C. W. Tawes & Son and watch the pickers in action. .. A good picker can do 15 lbs of crab meat an hour (for a short time).
Treasures from the Past - Outside_Tawes_museum

Treasures from the Past - Outside_Tawes_museum


After we left the museum, we looked for a place to eat. The Waterman's Inn was the first thing we came to, but it was closed Monday and Tuesday (the two days we expected to be in town).
Bob resting in front of the Waterman's Inn

Bob resting in front of the Waterman's Inn


It would probably be too fancy for us anyway. So we walked down to the Side Street Seafood Market and Restaurant at 204 S. Tenth Street. The marina gave us 'wooden nickels' which the boy said were good for a free beer or half price meal. (I asked him if beer was that expensive here.) It turned out to be $1.00 off for each token. In addition to the restaurant and seafood sales, they also rent bikes.

It was a bit early for dinner and very late for lunch as it was only a little after 4, but we climbed the fire escape like steps outside (downstairs was the market part of it - a bench labeled 'Liar's bench' was outside under the window)
Liar's Bench

Liar's Bench


and went in. We opted to eat indoors because I noticed that the outdoor seating area
Citronella candles

Citronella candles


had buckets of citronella candles in a rack at the door. The restrooms had crabs on the doors and were labeled
Jimmys sign on the Men's Room

Jimmys sign on the Men's Room


and
Sooks' sign on the Ladies Room

Sooks' sign on the Ladies Room


The tables appeared to be made of PVC pipe and the chairs were ordinary outdoor lawn chairs.
Bob in the restaurant

Bob in the restaurant


The walls were apparently some type of laminate with delicately 'woodburned' scenes in a repeating pattern like wallpaper.

They had something on the menu called a
Deep fried hard crab

Deep fried hard crab


which was hard to imagine. When asked, they explained that they took off the top carapace, cleaned the crab (removing the lungs I guess) filled the space with crab meat, dip the whole thing in batter and deep fry it. I tried that. It lacked in the execution. The crab part was good, but the batter was a thick pasty scorched tasting type thing. Bob had a
Half dozen steamed crabs

Half dozen steamed crabs


We both drank tea and the bill was $26. With the $2 off and a tip, the total was $29.00. They also have an all-you-can-eat crab and corn feast $20.95 Per Person.

Then we meandered slowly (in the heat) up main street to Gordon's Confectionery at 831 W. Main Street, which had Hershey's ice cream.
Counter area of Gordons

Counter area of Gordons


This has no ambiance or decor. There were some locals occupying shabby tables and chairs at the back, and there was a TV tuned to a sports broadcast. (I was chastised for writing this by someone who said it was authentic and real. Which it was - that was the point of what I wrote. I didn't mean that I didn't like it or that I thought it should be different.) They also sold snacks and I think they had a grille.

Cones were cheaper than cups, so I got a double dip cone (chocolate mint chip and Moose Tracks). Moose tracks proved to be vanilla with very large chunks of chocolate. (I suppose Moose Scat wouldn't be as appetizing but I thought that's what it was more reminiscent of.) Bob asked for fudge but they only had peanut butter fudge so that's what he got - single dip. We (or I) sat at the table under the TV because it was so hot I couldn't have eaten the ice cream before it melted if I were outside.

Then we came back to the boat. The power boaters were having a party on the pier - every time we went up or down they had to move to let us through.

SEAHORSE (a sailboat that we had heard on the radio) had been put next to us. I went up to swim in the pool and get a shower because I was very hot and sticky.

We talked to the guy from SEAHORSE who was leaving on Monday and who intended to go to Washington DC for the 4th of July fireworks. He had a reservation at Gangplank Marina. We asked how he was going to get under the Woodrow Wilson (I-95) bridge. He didn't think he'd have a problem but he has a 53' mast and the bridge is only 50'. We explained that they needed 24 hours notice and only opened between midnight and 5 am.

Bob got the DirectTV antenna out and mounted it but couldn't get a signal. Eventually we decided that the direction of the satellite was directly abeam and the boom was in the way. We got it sorted out eventually.
Bob_on_RosalieAnn

Bob_on_RosalieAnn


Sunset_from_our_boat

Sunset_from_our_boat


Monday night, I had trouble sleeping because of the heat so I got up and wrote part of the narrative. Then there were storms and lightning (and it got a lot cooler) so I got up early and wrote part 2.

Tuesday July 1, 2003

When the marina office opened, I went up to their email line and tried sending it. No luck. I just could NOT get the computer to hook up. It would do the protocol and then say that my password was wrong (which I knew it was not). So I gave up and decided just to wait. My pocketmail (which I was accessing by bag phone from the boat) was also getting jammed with a lot of bounce notices, and I thought that might be part of the problem.

After breakfast (one bad egg - we need to get more) we walked out an looked at the gift shops.
Souvenir store

Souvenir store


Nothing whatever of interest - just ordinary country gingham stuff and things with crabs pictures. We also went to a couple of hardware stores. One was Clarence Sterling & Son Marine Hardware.
Clarence Sterling and Son Marine Hardware.Store facade

Clarence Sterling and Son Marine Hardware.Store facade


Anytime you have a store that says it is 'marine' store, the prices are probably half again as high as for the same thing at a regular store. This store was the second post office for Crisfield. The building is interesting for that. It has a tin ceiling,
Tin ceiling

Tin ceiling


but the floor felt spongy underfoot as if the underpinnings were rotten. We also went to Forbush & Sons Hardware
Forbush Hardware

Forbush Hardware


It was here that Bob bought a flashlight to replace one on the boat that wore out (a nice yellow one - very easy to spot whether it is in its place or not) and some nut drivers so he could do the sat-dish adjustments easier.
Storefront_and_street_sign

Storefront_and_street_sign


While I was waiting for him I noticed that the street signs have crabs on them. Although Annapolis is "Crab Town" in CB lingo, the real crab town in Maryland is Crisfield.
Crabby street sign

Crabby street sign

The Tawes family is really BIG in Crisfield. In addition to the Tawes Museum, and the library in the old Gov. Tawes home, all the places on Main Street appeared to be food or gifts or hardware and/or owned by a Tawes.
Tawes Oil Company

Tawes Oil Company


It was too early to eat lunch, but we only had bread and mayo on board- no tuna or cheese or lettuce or tomato. So we stopped in Captain's Carryout (a little deli next to the Side Street Market)
Captains_Carryout

Captains_Carryout


and got take-out sandwiches. I got a chicken salad sandwich for $2.50. It was very good. If I have a choice, that's what I usually get, as I can make tuna salad without much effort at home and a lot cheaper. Bob got his favorite, which was a turkey half sub ($4.75). We had things to drink on the boat, so we didn't buy any. We went back to the boat. but you could also go out on the Town pier
Bob resting by the town dock

Bob resting by the town dock

Town dock

Town dock

View_from_city_dock

View_from_city_dock


and eat either in the shade or sun depending on your preference or the weather. We ate in the cockpit watching and listening to the antics of the power boat group from Middle River that was just down the dock from us.

Then I read the Sunday comics and napped. At 12:20, Bob woke me, and we walked over to the Tawes Museum again to take the trolley/bus tour.
Trolley bus

Trolley bus


The driver John (from upstate NY) told us that the bus had just been repainted by the prisoners in the state pen. He'd only been driving the bus for 2 weeks.
Driver of the tour

Driver of the tour


The bus tour was another $2.50 each, and we found that if we had waited and gone to the museum afterwards, it would have been only another $1 instead of the $2.50 we had paid. We found this out from the power boaters as they certainly didn't tell us at the museum. We paid at the gift shop, which was open this time. There were more interesting things in there than anything we saw in town.

Our guide was an old man wearing Bermuda shorts and white knee socks named Squeaky. I'm not sure that he took us everywhere the tour was supposed to go. I was at the front and could hear some of the discussions between him and the driver about where other guides had taken the tour groups.

We passed Bob's aunt's former house (unfortunately I did not get a picture because by the time we recognized it, we were past it - we came at it from a different direction than when we were driving ourselves), and stopped at the cemetery where Curley Byrd, former president of the University of MD is buried.
Cemetery

Cemetery


Harry Clifton "Curley" Byrd was born in Crisfield and graduated at the age of nineteen, from the Maryland Agricultural College, as the Un. of MD was then known, with a degree in civil engineering. He returned to his alma mater late in 1912 as an instructor in English, an assistant in physical culture, and football coach.

Byrd rapidly climbed the administrative ranks at the university, becoming VP in 1932. When Raymond Pearson resigned as president in 1935, the Board of Regents named Byrd acting president, making his appointment permanent on February 21, 1936. Many view him as the father of the modern University of Maryland. Byrd went on to become known, appropriately, as a builder; of enrollment, of budgets, of buildings. Between the time of Byrd's appointment as vice president in the '20s and his resignation as president in 1954, the university's take of the state budget more than quadrupled to $4,500,000, and enrollment jumped from under 2,000 to more than 15,000.

In a 1941 book, "Curley Byrd Catches the Worm" by Bob Considine, a writer for the Saturday Evening Post, Considine describes him as the "dictator, president, athletic director, football coach, comptroller, chief lobbyist and glamour boy supreme" "Curley is the most-hated and most-beloved man in Maryland," wrote Considine

In 1954, Byrd resigned from the presidency to run unsuccessfully for governor of Maryland against Theodore McKeldin. In retirement, he pursued a career in real estate, banking, construction, and publishing and two unsuccessful campaigns for the U. S. House of Representatives.
Waterman's docks near the Ward Brothers shop

Waterman's docks near the Ward Brothers shop


We stopped at the home/shop of the Ward brothers who made fantastic decorative decoys (they have passed on long since).
Ward Brother's shop sign

Ward Brother's shop sign


They called themselves 'Wildfowl Counterfeiters'. The Ward Brothers (Lem and Steve) revolutionized decoy making with their expert wood carving and painting. One of the brothers did the carving, and the other one did the painting.
Area_where_ducks were painted

Area_where_ducks were painted


Sign about the bandsaw

Sign about the bandsaw


The workshop has been carefully restored to it's original location near the Salt Marshes of Pocomoke Sound off the Chesapeake Bay. It shows the way it was 100 years ago and illustrates the life and times of the Ward brothers.
Large bandsaw

Large bandsaw


Chopping block where rough hewing was done

Chopping block where rough hewing was done


Lem and Steve were sons of a Crisfield barber and boatbuilder. They produced nearly 25,000 decoys in 60 years of work. Lem's daughter Ida still resides in the adjacent family house.
Hollowing out the body before the use of balsa wood

Hollowing out the body before the use of balsa wood

Machinery

Machinery


The shop is on Sackertown Road which is near the marshes, shores and waters of Jenkins Creek about 40 miles south of Salisbury.
Shaping the body

Shaping the body


The shop is under the oversight of the Crisfield Heritage Foundation
Duck decoys in the cabinet on the other side of finish workshop

Duck decoys in the cabinet on the other side of finish workshop


We also saw the J. Millard Tawes homeplace now being made into a library.
J_Millard_Tawes library

J_Millard_Tawes library


Construction of this house was begun in 1887 by the Governor's father, James Tawes at about the same time as he married Alice Byrd (Tawes) who might have been a relative of Curley Byrd. The house was originally a two-story center hall home which was common on the Eastern Shore at that time. The columned portico on the front and a porte cochere adjacent to the sunroom were added later. Total modifications were completed in 1920, over 30 years after James had started building the home. The J. Millard Tawes Foundation, now the Crisfield Heritage Foundation, purchased the home in 1997 and is in the process of restoring it to its original beauty. The Foundation plans to display the Governor's artifacts and offer the public access to his library, including his correspondence, speeches and research materials.
J_Millard_Tawes home

J_Millard_Tawes home


Governor Tawes and his two brothers and sister grew up in this house and he lived here until his marriage in 1912 to Helen Avalynne Gibson, his companion of over 60 years. We heard all about his two brothers. (J. Millard Tawes was governor of Maryland.) But his one sister was dismissed with, "Oh she left the area."

The power boaters were dancing on the pier when we got back. They had turned on their music very loud, but moderated it to a dull roar.

They were interested in the screen painting on our boat. Some of them were from Baltimore and knew what it was. They have not eaten in any restaurants while they were here. The owner of the boat next to us demonstrated the crane he has to put his dinghy (with motor attached) onto the deck. Found out they were leaving at 7 the next morning.

Bob, who had found out where the market was on the tour, walked up and got butter, eggs, cheese, lettuce and tomatoes. He said the prices were reasonable. Apparently the market will let you take a cart to the marina and the market will retrieve it later. Bob had a cooler on a luggage cart with him so he didn't need to do that.
Cove Restaurant sign on the main street

Cove Restaurant sign on the main street


We walked up to the COVE restaurant which is the sister restaurant to the Bayside Inn on Smith Island that the tour boats take people to. Apparently the second floor has accommodations for tourists who come from Pt. Lookout to visit Smith Island and spend the night in Crisfield. We would have gone to Peppys or the Captain's Galley or possibly even the Fisherman's Inn, but they were all closed both Monday and Tuesday.
Cove_restaurant

Cove_restaurant


The Cove Restaurant is a nice restaurant but not excessively nice. That is they don't give themselves aires and the prices are reasonable. The tables are wood and there is stainless tableware and paper place mats. The placemats have lighthouses on them, but none of them are Chesapeake Bay lighthouses. There are big windows along one side of the dining room. The centerpieces on the table are miniature cat tails in bud vase type glasses with net and shell wrap. Very unusual and nice. There are big windows along one side of the dining room. Bob had soup and salad instead of an entree - cream of crab soup and a seafood salad both of which looked excellent.
Crabcake Sandwich

Crabcake Sandwich


I had a crab cake sandwich which was also good - broiled and not a lot of filler. I also had a creme brulee cheesecake, and just thinking about it makes my mouth water. Our meal was about $35
Sunset watching point

Sunset watching point


They put another big 40 foot power boat next to us in SEAHORSE'S slip and the DirectTV reception didn't even flicker when it went by. I did the route to Tangier on the computer, and listened to the weather especially about Hurricane Bill.

July 2, 2003

Woke up early and looked at the weather reports (local Washington TV stations, the Weather Channel and NOAA) and discussed whether to go to Tangier or not. We were pretty sure we could get there as the rain was not "scheduled" (predicted) to start until afternoon. But we know that being in a marina someplace when it is pouring rain all the time isn't particularly fun. So we decided to see if we could get back to our home marina at Point Lookout before the weather got too bad.

The power boat group fired up their engines waking the whole marina about 6:30. We took our line off the piling so that the power boat next to us could get underway. We ourselves started our engine (much more quietly except for the oil pressure alarm which always sounds when the engine is off) and then Bob took off the lines while I backed out of the slip about 7:30. As we motored by the folks that were anchored out, I went out on deck.
Coast Guard station across from the marina

Coast Guard station across from the marina


Note - the big ship in the Coast Guard Station is named J. Millard Tawes for the former governor.
J Milton Tawes

J Milton Tawes


In the marina, we could hear the announcements over the PA system from this CG station. The DNR (Department of Natural Resources) office is on the left, and there is a boat ramp, fish cleaning station and bathrooms on the left of this location.

As we went out the channel, I took photos of the town from the water (I had been too busy looking for the marina to do that before).
View from the marina

View from the marina

Crisfield water tower

Crisfield water tower


Sterlng and Tawes Hardware from the entrance channel

Sterlng and Tawes Hardware from the entrance channel

Crab houses

Crab houses

Smith Island Ferry

Smith Island Ferry

Tangier ferry

Tangier ferry

Cruise boats

Cruise boats

Twister

Twister

Crab boat

Crab boat

Crisfield

Crisfield

Crab house

Crab house

On the way out

On the way out


Also I took photos of the anchorage. Boats sometimes anchor in the Crisfield harbor basin.
Anchorage

Anchorage


It is possible to do this although it is quite a busy area with boats docked all the way around the perimeter. I personally would not do it. You have to pay for dinghy dockage at the municipal marina if you do this.
Sign as you leave the harbor

Sign as you leave the harbor


Ahead of us was the blue hulled boat with a name that started with TS that was outside on the T-head appeared to be somewhat confused, or else aground or both.(A T-head is the end of the dock where the last finger piers are extended all the way to the end of the slip i.e. forms a T with the main dock as the stem. So it makes one big long dock that you can only tie to one side instead of to pilings on each side.)
Sailboat following us out of the channel

Sailboat following us out of the channel


Another boat (I think MIRA) which had been anchored was following us.
Spider

Spider


We later heard the boat with the name that started TS on the radio (and I still don't know how to pronounce the name - the word she said on the radio bore no relation to the letters I remember) calling Parks Marina (which is on Tangier Island and doesn't answer the radio) and then calling the Smith Island Marina which is an entirely different island altogether.

Bob pulled out the jib and ran the refrigeration. The refrigeration is a dual system and runs either off the engine or off 110 dockside power.

MIRA was cutting the corners and was soon out of sight. We were able to motor sail a little bit.

We put up the side curtains because was starting to rain, and I fixed Bob a cheese lettuce and tomato sandwich. For awhile the radar showed that we were under our own little rain cloud which appeared to be centered on our mast and was following us like the little rain cloud that follows Joe Bfstk in L'il Abner. We saw in the distance the lighthouse at Solomon's Lump.
Solomon's Lump

Solomon's Lump


This was originally a caisson light built in 1895 which replaced a screwpile light built in 1875. Ice knocked over the screwpile light. It was replaced with a caisson The bottom being soft, the caisson sank further than expected, and an extra course of plates had to be added to the top. A brick tower and octagonal wooden house were erected on this foundation. The house was later demolished leaving just the asymmetrical tower

Target ship in the distance

Target ship in the distance


We came around the end of Smith Island and saw the target ship which I had never seen before. At first Bob thought it was a menhaden boat, but menhaden fishing is not allowed in Maryland.
Target ship in 2007

Target ship in 2007


Eventually we figured it out. I had the route going south of the ship, but Bob wanted to go north so we went north which was longer. We had enough wind for a very short time that the boat even heeled a bit.

We had zero wind after we got into the Potomac, but we had quartering seas so Bob left the main up to keep us steady.

We got into our slip by 1430 after 36.7 nm and 7 hours. It would have been even shorter to go through Tangier. The heavy rain held off until later.

As I walked down the dock to get a cart, one of the guys sitting on the dock next to a group of SeaRays said, "Didn't I see you in Crisfield". It turned out their group was on the other side of the group with the BIG motor boats from Middle River. They had left at 10:15, and gotten here way before us.

After we unloaded the boat and got home, I did email, and my password was perfectly OK as I had thought.

We had dinner at Clarkes Landing
Sitting at the window

Sitting at the window

Swordfish at Clarke's Landing

Swordfish at Clarke's Landing

Creme Brulee at Clarkes Landing

Creme Brulee at Clarkes Landing


Our daughter came down to visit and we had lunch in Schiebles
Daughter and grandson in Schiebles

Daughter and grandson in Schiebles

July 30th was my mother's 94th birthday.
Me, my sister and my mom with her 94th birthday cake

Me, my sister and my mom with her 94th birthday cake

Our son visited from SC in August and we took them to a Pope's Creek (on their way home) for hard crabs.
Potomac_River_from_restaurant_window-Popes_Creek

Potomac_River_from_restaurant_window-Popes_Creek

Son and grandson

Son and grandson

Granddaughter washing her hands

Granddaughter washing her hands

Granddaughter eating crabs

Granddaughter eating crabs


And then in October there was Hurricane Isabel and we started down the Intercoastal again for what turned out to be the last time.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 14:12 Archived in USA Tagged crab crisfield duck_decoys tawes menhaden Comments (3)

(Entries 1 - 1 of 1) Page [1]